Enhanced Diamonds?

My partner wants to shop at Tiffany's! BUT, for the money, we can get three times the ring by not having to pay for the Tiffany name. That is the route I want to go...more "bling" for our buck!




I have been doing some research on enhanced diamonds, and know it is quite controversial. The issue for me is whether the enhancement process is permanent or not. These diamonds still hold a GIA certificate. Would love some input on the subject. As well, how safe is buying online?

Comments for Enhanced Diamonds?

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

May 19, 2010
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Clarity enhanced diamonds - a great option
by: Anonymous

Very many customers of mine, when give the choice of clarity enhanced diamonds or non enhanced diamonds, will actually choose the clarity enhanced option. The reason for this is simple - with a lifetime guarantee on the treatment and after our expert diamond setters have set the diamond in the ring (usually), there really is no real disadvantage to the CE diamond, other than a psychological one of knowing that it is enhanced. Our customers therefore can afford a beautiful 1 carat diamond from as little as $2000, whereas a similar grade natural diamond would be at the very least $4500. It is crucial, however to purchase a CE diamond from a trusted source with a lifetime guarantee.

Feb 24, 2009
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Enhanced Diamonds
by: Anonymous

For the most part treatments made to enhanced diamonds is not permanant, even if the diamond has a GIA certificate with it. Diamonds that are fracture filled or clarity enhanced are often weaker that untreated diamonds, causing them to be vurnerable to heat and makes the diamond more suseptible to chipping. Heat from a jewelers torch and affect the stone, even the heat from an ultrasonic cleaner at a jewelry store can break the stone.

There are treatments out there for enhancing the color of the stone, such as irradiation and High pressure-High temperature (HPHT). These treatments are more permanent but rarely are used on white diamonds today, mainly on fancy colored diamonds to make them seem more vibrant. These treatments are more permanent.

Try to stay away from enhanced diamonds. I have worked in the retail jewelry business for the past ten years and have seen customers come into my store with diamonds that became chipped due to their being clarity-enhanced. Unfortunately these customers never asked who they bought the stone from what clarity enhanced meant, some of these customers even had the GIA report which stated that the diamond was clarity enhanced. Unfortunately the effects do not happen right away and most people who sell clarity enhanced diamonds are independant vendors who usually work out of booths on month-to-month leases with no return policies, giving customers nowhere to go to voice their concerns.

Usually the only way to get the most "bang for your buck" when buying a diamond is to cut out the middle man. Go to a diamond district (57th street in NYC if you live in the area) or if you happen to know someone in the jewelry business that can get diamonds at or near cost. However, if you do not know much about diamonds going to a diamond district might not be for you bacause those people PREY on people that know little about jewelry and you would probably end up buying a enhanced diamond without you knowing it and without being told. You also would not get any warranties on the jewelry in case if god forbid something breaks or gets damaged. Working in retail I understand what people say about the markups, but when it comes to when you are buying something as sentimental as an engagement ring, soemthing that will be worn for everyday for he rest of your life, I know that I would feel better knowing that if something happens (trust me it will) I know that there is a company that will repair it for me, as long as the company stays in business so make sure you do your research on the stability of a company before you purchase something.


Feb 14, 2009
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Clarity enhanced diamonds
by: Anonymous

I totally agree with you about buying more "bling for your buck" than going for a designer name. Nobody would even know its a Tiffany ring unless they are looking at the inner side of the band for the label or if they outright ask you.

Buying online can be safe if you buy from a reputable company. Make sure to check out the Business's stats. Are they registered with the Better Business Bureau, how well known are they, what is their return policy, if you google them, what kinds of things come up...i.e. customers raving about them or complaining.

f I were you, I would play it safe and stay clear of clarity enhanced diamonds. I think the cons outweigh the pros. :

Many people are unaware that a number of techniques are used to improve the clarity of diamonds by removing or hiding imperfections.
Two very common techniques are laser drilling and fracture filling. Many diamonds come from the earth with tiny black inclusions inside them. Even if they are hard to see, they tend to scatter light and reduce the brilliance of the diamond. About 25 years ago, high powered laser beams were first used to "burn-out" these impurities. To reach the inclusion, a laser drill is used to create a tiny hole reaching deep inside the diamond. Often the laser's heat will vaporize the speck. If not, acid is poured into the hole, usually dissolving the spot or bleaching it to a less noticeable white color. Naturally, this process is irreversible. And, since it has become an "industry-standard" procedure, it's not usually disclosed by diamond sellers. The holes are so small in diameter, it's very difficult to see that the diamond has been drilled. Still, looking at the side of the stone in very bright light may show some thin "threads." Diamond grading reports will usually indicate that a stone has been laser drilled. However, drilled diamonds are less desirable and worth considerably less than undrilled ones of otherwise equal size and equal grade.

2. Fracture Filling
Sometimes, a chemical substance is used to fill small cracks in a diamond. The effect of this treatment can be very dramatic, turning a very "ugly" diamond into one that is remarkably brilliant. However, all other things being equal, a treated, clarity-enhanced diamond is worth much less than one that is naturally beautiful. There's nothing inherently wrong with gem enhancement, as long as you know what's been done to the stone, and you're not paying for one thing and receiving another. It is important to note that, if a fracture filled diamond is submitted to extreme heat (such as that used with a jeweler's torch for ring sizing or prong repairs), the filling material may bleed out of the diamond, thus leaving the formerly masked inclusion visible.




Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Totally Free Engagement Ring Advice.